Haverford College
Syllabus Update

Course Information
for

Title:Term:  
Department:Cross-Listed:
Division:
 
Instructor(s):
Description:
Prerequisites:
Limited Enrollment:
Dept Web Page:



Semester/Topic Description::

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the first phase of �globalization� in world history, with particular emphasis on the years from approximately 1300-1800. It provides a basic introduction to the social and cultural history of late medieval and early modern Eurasia, Africa and the Americas. Thematically, the course focuses on trans-regional processes such as the emergence of states and the formation of empires; trade and technology transfers; varied historically situated constructions of gender and sexuality; and many types of cultural exchanges, including the emergence and spread of world religious traditions. The issue of representation in the construction of historical memory (how we record, interpret and recreate the past orally, visually and in writing) is also systematically engaged throughout the course.

Additional information/Expanded description:

James Krippner
Hall 215
Ext.-1049
jkrippne@haverford.edu
Office Hours: Fri. 10-12
And by appt.

HIST 114a: ORIGINS OF THE GLOBAL SOUTH.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the first phase of �globalization� in world history, with particular emphasis on the years from approximately 1300-1800. It provides a basic introduction to the social and cultural history of late medieval and early modern Eurasia, Africa and the Americas. Thematically, the course focuses on trans-regional processes such as the emergence of states and the formation of empires; trade and technology transfers; varied historically situated constructions of gender and sexuality; and many types of cultural exchanges, including the emergence and spread of world religious traditions. The issue of representation in the construction of historical memory (how we record, interpret and recreate the past orally, visually and in writing) is also systematically engaged throughout the course.

History 114a is designed as a �hands on� seminar that will introduce students to the study of history at the college level. In addition to reading monographs, book chapters and articles produced by specialists as well as those writing for general audiences, we will also work with primary sources that ask you to be the historian. These include written documents from the eras under consideration, transcriptions of oral histories, visual sources including art and architecture, and literature and film. The instructor believes that history is most interesting as a craft involving original research, innovative analysis and creative writing. Thus, assignments have been developed as a progression aimed at developing these skills, which are necessary for practicing historians (and especially those thinking about becoming history majors at Haverford College!).


REQUIRED TEXTS

The following books and pamphlets have been placed on reserve and are available for purchase at the Haverford College bookstore. They are listed in order of use.

Rampolla, Mary Lynn. A Pocket Guide to Writing in History. Sixth Edition. Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martins, 2010.

Wills, John E., Jr. The World From 1450-1700. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.

Sunjata: A West African Epic of the Mande Peoples. Translated by David C. Conrad. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2004.

Mann, Charles C. 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus. New York: Vintage Books, 2006.

Schwartz, Stuart B. All Can Be Saved: Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2008.

Trouillot, Michel-Rolph. Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History. Boston: Beacon Press, 1995.

The following articles and book chapters have been placed on reserve and are accessible on-line through Magill Library reserves. They are listed in the order of use.

Carpini, John of Plano. �History of the Mongols.� In Worlds of History: A Comparative Reader, Volume One: To 1550, Second Edition, edited by Kevin Reilly. Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martins, 2004, 413-419.

Levathes, Louise. �The Strange Kingdoms of Malacca and Ceylon.� Chap. in When China Ruled the Seas: The Treasure Fleet of the Dragon Throne, 1405-1433, 107-122. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

Hamdun, Said and No�l King, ed. and trans. Ibn Battuta in Black Africa, vii-25. Princeton: Markus Wiener, 1994, orig. 1975.

Portelli, Alessandro. �What Makes Oral History Different.� In The Oral History Reader, Second Edition, edited by Robert Perks and Alistair Thomson. London and New York: Routledge, 2006 (orig. 1998), 32-42.

Tignor, et. al. �Cultures of Splendor and Power, 1600-1780.� Chap. in Worlds Together, Worlds Apart. New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company, 2002, 163-195.

Garcia M�rquez, Gabriel. �My Thanks.� In The General in His Labyrinth. Translated by Edith Grossman. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1990, 271-274.

Davis, Natalie Zemon. Slaves on Screen: Film and Historical Vision. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2000, 55-68.

Rosenstone, Robert A. �History in Images/History in Words: Reflections on the Possibility of Really Putting History onto Film.� Chap. in Visions of the Past: The Challenge of Film to Our Idea of History. Cambridge, Massachusetts and London, England: Harvard University Press, 1995, 19-44.

COURSE SCHEDULE

WEEK 1 (TU 8/30, TH 9/1). Introduction: The World in 1300.

1. Introduction: �Why Study Global History.� Review syllabus, discuss course.
2. �The World in 1300.� Reading: Wills, xi-6. Rampolla, v-38.

UNIT I: ORIGINS AND CONNECTIONS: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL WORLDS.

WEEK 2 (TU 9/6-TH 9/8). Present and Past: Recalling Medieval Africa.

3. �Africa Until The Rise of Mali.� Reading: Portelli, 32-42. Sunjata, vii-xlviii. Rampolla, 39-65. Video clip from �Keita! The Voice of the Griot� (Kouyate, 1994).
4. �Sunjata in Historical Context.� Sunjata, entire.

WEEK 3 (TU 9/13-TH 9/15). Eurasian Networks of Trade and Cultural Exchange.

5. �The Silk Roads and After.� Reading: Wills, 7-25. Carpini, 413-420.
6. �The Indian Ocean World to 1500.� Reading: Levathes, 107-122. Hamdun and King, vii-25.

Note: At least one short response paper must be handed in by the start of Class 7!

WEEK 4 (TU 9/20-TH 9/22). The Americas, Part I.

7. �The Emergence of American Civilizations, 200-1450 CE.� Reading: Mann, ix-148.
8. �Andean Worlds.� Reading: Mann, 149-270.

WEEK 5 (TU 9/27-TH 9/29). The Americas, Part II.

9. �Mesoamerica.� Reading: Mann, 271-366.
10. �The Indigenous Caribbean.� Reading: Mann, 367-410.

Note: At least two short response papers must be handed in by the start of Class 11!

WEEK 6 (TU 10/4-TH 10/6). The Many Meanings of 1492.

11. �The Columbian Voyages, the Columbian Exchange and Their Historians.� Reading: Wills, 26-48.
12. Mid-term Exam.

WEEK 7. Fall Break.

UNIT II: THE FIRST PHASE OF �GLOBALISATION,� 1492-1700.

WEEK 8 (Tu 10/18, Th 10/20). Economics, Labor and Culture in the Early Modern World.

13. �Mediterranean and Atlantic Origins of Sugar Plantations.� Reading: Wills, 49-71. Schwartz, xi-69.
14. �The Portuguese in Asia, Africa and Brazil.� Reading: Wills, 72-95. Schwartz, 70-118.

WEEK 9 (TU 10/25, TH 10/27). Settlers, Diasporas and �Culture Wars� in the 17th Century.

15. �Religion in the Early Modern World.� Reading: Wills, 96-118. Schwartz, 119-176.
16. ��Sugar and World History Through the Plantation Complex.� Reading: Wills, 119-140. Schwartz, 177-206.

WEEK 10 (TU 11/1-TH 11/3). Tensions and Tolerance on the Eve of Modernity.

17. �Baroque Legacies: Splendor and Misery.� Reading: Wills, 139-154. Schwartz, 207-241.
18. �Tolerance, Past and Present.� Reading: Schwartz, 242-255.

Note: Three short response papers must be handed in by the start of Class 19!

WEEK 11 (TU 11/8-TH 11/10). Research Week: Art and Architecture in the Early Modern World.

19. Class will meet in the Phillips Wing of Magill Library. You must choose your research topic by the end of class today! Reading: Tignor, et. al., �Cultures,� 163-195.
20. Research Seminar. Reading: Rampolla, 66-85.

WEEK 12 (TU 11/15, 11/17). Research and Presentation Week.

21. Oral Presentations. Reading: Rampolla, 86-93.
22. Oral Presentations. Reading: Rampolla, 94-132.

Note: The intermediate length 6-8 pg. research paper must be handed in as an e-mail attachment word document or as a .pdf by Sunday, November 21, 11:59 p.m. (you can choose to submit it when you go to bed or prior to 8 a.m. Monday).

UNIT III: HISTORY, MEMORY AND THE TRICKS OF TIME.

WEEK 13 (TU 11/22). Writing (and Re-Writing) The Past.

23. �Pasts and Presents: Challenges of Writing History.� Reading: Garc�a M�rquez, 271-274. Trouillot, xi- 30.

WEEK 14 (TU 11/29, TH 12/1). Colonial Legacies, Past and Present.

24. �The Haitian Revolution.� Reading: Trouillot, 31-107.
25. �Power and the Writing of History.� Reading: Trouillot, 108-156.


WEEK 15 (TU 12/6-12/8). History and Film.

26. �History, Representation and Film.� Reading: Rosenstone, 1-16. Davis, 55-68.
27. Concluding discussion, review for final exam, course evaluations.

Film: �The Last Supper.� Tom�s Gut�errez Alea, Cuba, 1977. 120 mins. A viewing of this film will be scheduled, probably on Tuesday, Dec. 6, at 8 p.m.


EXPLANATION OF ASSIGNMENTS AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Your final grade will be based on class participation (10% of the final grade), three short response papers, not to exceed 3 pages in length (15% of the final grade), a mid-term exam (15% of the final grade), an oral presentation (10 % of the final grade), an intermediate length research paper (6-8 pgs., 1800-2400 words, typed or computer printed, double spaced with normal fonts and margins, worth 25% of the final grade), and a final exam (25 % of final grade).

Class participation means contributing your presence, thoughts and voice to class meetings. Obviously, this can�t be done if you aren�t in class (or if you arrive late and disrupt an ongoing class). You are allowed only one unexcused absence from class, after which I will lower your class participation grade one grade for each missed class! To participate effectively also requires that you keep up with readings and lectures, think about the issues posed by the materials of the week, and discuss the concerns raised by readings, lectures, film and documents. Your performance in the oral presentation is also part of your class participation grade.

The three response papers not to exceed 3 pages in length will ask you to respond to a question provided concerning the readings and film for that week. You must write three of these papers by the first class of week 6.

The mid-term exam will be taken in class. It will consist of a short I.D. section and one essay question asking you to construct an argument integrating the readings from weeks 1-6.

The intermediate length 6-8 pg. research paper will investigate the art or architecture of the early modern world. All papers must be typed or computer printed with standard fonts and margins and must have proper scholarly apparatus as demonstrated in the Mary Lynn Rampolla guide. This will include proper footnotes or endnotes and a bibliography or works cited page. It is your responsibility to make a copy (on a memory stick, or printed) of all your papers in case your work is lost, misplaced or dissolves into cyberspace!!! Late work will receive at least one grade penalty (thus a 4.0 becomes a 3.7, 3.7 a 3.3, and so on). In rare instances extensions may be granted, but they will be short and must be negotiated with the instructor well in advance of the deadline.

The final exam will be taken during the exam period at the end of the semester. It will consist of a medium-length identification section and two essay questions. The first question will ask you to construct an argument drawing upon weeks 8-10, as well as your research project from weeks 11 and 12. The second question will focus on weeks 13-15.

Note: In order to be more environmentally friendly (by reducing paper use) and better organized, I would like you to submit your papers in word or .pdf format as e-mail attachments. They must have a title that allows me to identify your work. Thus, please label the papers as follows.

1. For short response papers, identify the class, the assignment with a number, your first initial and last name. Thus, if I were a student it would be H114SR1JKrippner, H114SRP2JKrippner, etc.

2. For the intermediate length research paper, H114RPJKrippner.

The exams will be hand-written in �blue books� in order to guarantee a level playing field for all students.