Haverford College

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Texts

� Prothrow-Stith, D. and Spivak, H. R. 2004. Murder Is No Accident. Understanding and Preventing Youth Violence in America. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

� Levy, B. S. and Sidel, V. W. 2000. War and Public Health. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association.

� Farmer, P. 2004. Pathologies of Power. Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

� Additional articles posted on Blackboard



Grading

� Class participation 20 pts

� Assignments

o Analysis of Phila program 20 pts

o Interdisciplinary dialogue 15 pts

o Report on armed conflict 15 pts

o Web page or poster 15 pts

� Final exam 15 pts

TOTAL 100 pts







SYLLABUS



I. Case study of the public health model: preventing youth violence in the United States (weeks 1-3)

� Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 2006. �Youth Violence: Fact Sheet.� http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/factsheets/yvfacts.htm (accessed Jan. 24, 2007)

� Prothrow-Stith, D. and Spivak, H. R. 2004. Murder Is No Accident. Understanding and Preventing Youth Violence in America. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

� Resnick, M. D., Ireland, M., and Borowsky, I. 2004. �Youth Violence Perpetration: What Protects? What Predicts? Findings from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.� Society for Adolescent Medicine 35: 424.e1-424.e10.

� Assignment: Analysis of the effectiveness of a violence prevention or intervention program in Philadelphia, 5-7pp.





II. What is to be gained from a public health approach to violence? What are the gaps/blind spots? (weeks 4-5)

� What are the dangers of medicalizing violence? Perspectives from medical anthropology:

o Kleinman, A. and Desjarlais, R. 1995. �Violence, Culture, and the Politics of Trauma� in Writing at the Margin: Discourse Between Anthropology and Medicine, pp. 173-192. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

o Klinenberg, E. 1999. �Denaturalizing Disaster: A Social Autopsy of the 1995 Chicago Heat Wave.� Theory and Society 28: 239-292. Abridged in N. Scheper-Hughes and P. Bourgois, eds., 2004. Violence in War and Peace. An Anthology, pp. 308-317. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

� What insights and caveats do other disciplines offer? Selected readings in

o Political Philosophy: Hannah Arendt, Michele Foucault, Rene Girard, Thomas Hobbes, Julia Kristeva

o Behavioral Psychology and Sociobiology: Konrad Lorenz, Stanley Milgram, E. O. Wilson

� Assignment: Hypothetical interview with one of the above authors for an article in American Journal of Public Health devoted to violence prevention, 3-5pp.





III. Direct Political Violence: War and Other Acts of Violence between States (weeks 6-10)

� What are the public health costs of war?

o Levy, B. S. and Sidel, V. W. 2000. War and Public Health. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association.

� Is a public health model relevant for political conflict?

o Koppell, C. with Sharma, A. 2003. �Preventing the Next Wave of Conflict. Understanding Non-Traditional Threats to Global Stability.� Washington, D.C.: Conflict Prevention Project of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

� Assignment: Report on public health costs of a current armed conflict, 5-7pp.





IV. Structural Violence (weeks 11-13)

� Farmer, P. 2004. Pathologies of Power. Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

� Assignment: Web page or poster presentation highlighting a specific public health program that addresses structural violence in a particular setting.





V. Conclusion (week 14)

� Is violence preventable? If so, what kinds? By what means?

� Final essay exam